8 Things You Need To Know About Adderall

 

1. If you like the feeling of Adderall or Ritalin, you may be less likely to have ADHD.

If you like the feeling of Adderall or Ritalin, you may be less likely to have ADHD.
According to the Business Insider, a recent study had the surprising finding that people who were genetically predisposed to feel euphoria when on stimulants were also less likely to have genes that predisposed them to ADHD and schizophrenia.

This might explain why some people who don’t have ADHD may be especially likely to abuse stimulants — it makes them feel particularly good.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kblteVbY

2. If you are creative, Adderall could impair your abilities.

If you are creative, Adderall could impair your abilities.

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Researchers recently had a small group of young adults perform a series of tasks related to creativity to see the kind of impact Adderall might have.

Adderall didn’t affect performance on all tasks, but on the tests in which it did have an effect it seemed to help those who were low-performing.

However, people who had performed well on the test without taking stimulants showed either no change or did worse while taking Adderall.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kblteVbY

3. ADHD drugs can be addictive.

ADHD drugs can be addictive.

Drugs like Adderall and Ritalin release a rush of dopamine in the brain, giving many people a sense of euphoria.

They help people feel alert, awake, and focused, but they also make it hard to sleep — making it more tempting to take another pill when you’re exhausted the next day.

People also develop a tolerance to these drugs, requiring more and more over time to achieve the same effect. Stimulants are considered addictive because it can be easy to become dependent on them.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kbrX4m1s

4. Stimulant-related emergency-room visits have tripled in recent years.

Stimulant-related emergency-room visits have tripled in recent years.

Though some don’t see them as drugs, stimulants — methylphenidate or amphetamines like speed — carry real risks.

Emergency-room visits for people 18 to 34 attributed to nonmedical stimulant use tripled from 2005 to 2011, though those numbers also include things like caffeine pills.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kbrkfAGC

5. Taking Adderall while drinking may increase the risks of heart problems.

Taking Adderall while drinking may increase the risks of heart problems.

Lots of college kids and young adults take stimulants like Adderall when they go out, either to stay up or just for the euphoric effect.

But drinking may increase the risk of heart problems for people taking stimulants, even when they don’t take an excessive amount of medication.

In at least one case, researchers documented a heart attack in an otherwise healthy 20-year-old who took 30 mg of Adderall after drinking.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kbt0f600

6. In rare cases, stimulant abuse has led to mental illness and psychosis.

In rare cases, stimulant abuse has led to mental illness and psychosis.

The FDA’s medication guide to Adderall warns people to call doctors immediately if they experience mental problems, “especially seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not real, or are suspicious.”

Worsened mental illness for adults and psychotic symptoms for children are among the listed side effects.

The medical literature includes case reports of methylphenidate, the active ingredient in Ritalin and Concerta, triggering depression in a 7-year-old and terrifying hallucinations in a 15-year-old. And The New York Times reported on the highly unusual but tragic case of Richard Fee, a 24-year-old from Virginia Beach. Fee developed very serious mental-health problems while battling a severe addiction to prescription stimulants and ultimately took his own life.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/should-i-take-adderall-2014-12#ixzz3kbtM1aWN

7. Almost Eight Percent of High School Seniors are Using Adderall

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In 2009, 5.4 percent of high school seniors were using Adderall without a prescription. By 2012, it was 7.6 percent. It is in fact, the only drug that saw an increase in use among high schoolers last year, according to a national report for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (PDF).

Read more: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/12/02/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-adderall.html

 

 

8. Adderall Can Cause Problems for your Fingers and Toes

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Stimulants direct blood flow to the brain and heart, and away from your periphery.

Don’t be surprised if your fingers and toes start to feel numb, cold, painful, or change color. But start to worry if you notice any small wounds or cuts in these regions, as without good blood flow, these are unlikely to heal and highly likely to get infected and become a serious concern.

Staying in one position for extended periods of time (such as when studying) can make symptoms worse.

Read more: http://www.drugs.com/slideshow/adderall-essentials-the-x-things-you-need-to-know-ic0059-1113#slide-4

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